Why Carpenter Ants Are So Dangerous

Carpenters ants are one of the largest types of ants found in the country, and can grow up to ½-inch in length. These ants can either be red or black in color, or even a combination of both red and black. Typically, carpenter ants can be found living in or around dead or rotted wood, but they do sometimes build a colony within a person’s home. It is true that carpenter ants can bite, but it is exceedingly rare that one actually bites a human. The main question that people often ask is that if they do not bite, why are carpenter ants so dangerous.

The danger lies within the structure of the home because carpenter ants build their nests inside wood, even if that wood is part of a house. The ants borrow into the wood causing it to hollow out, which can cause severe structural damage to a home if left undetected. Carpenter ants especially like to nest in damp wood, which makes them more prone to enter a home that has experienced water damage, leaks or condensation to the wood. Ants can usually be detected by professionals because of the sawdust the ants leave behind when building their nests.

One of the main complications with ridding a home of carpenter ants is the fact that their colonies are extraordinarily complex. In addition, these ants tend to create multiple nesting areas, so if just one of the locations is missed during extermination they will likely come back. The best way to prevent ants from entering the home is to replace any part of the structure that has sustained water damage. Ants also like to feed on plants, so it is imperative to keep plants around the house neatly trimmed to ensure that the leaves are not touching the house.

More details about carpenter ants and different methods dealing with them you can get by checking this link www.pestcontroltoronto.com

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